Pre/Postnatal Fitness.

Our Pre/Postnatal Fit classes include a combination of cardiovascular exercise and strength-conditioning exercise. Cardiovascular exercise is any exercise which increases your heart rate. This can include high or low impact exercise. Common examples are brisk walking, running and cycling. Strength-conditioning exercise involves using some form of resistance (weights, resistance bands or body weight) for muscle strengthening and toning. These exercises may also raise your heart rate a little, but the focus is more on muscle strengthening.

Current exercise guidelines for adults recommend participating in at least 150 minutes of moderate cardiovascular exercise (or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic exercise) per week. The guidelines also recommend undertaking at least 2 sessions per week of strength training for all major muscle groups.

Why Fitness Classes for Pregnancy?

Pregnancy exercise guidelines recommend women with uncomplicated pregnancies should aim to participate in moderate intensity cardiovascular exercise for at least 150 minutes per week, and strength-conditioning training at least twice per week, before, during and after pregnancy. Pregnant women who are accustomed to participating in more vigorous cardiovascular exercise may be able to continue with this, under guidance from their obstetric health care provider.

The guidelines recommend all pregnant women should seek advice from their health care provider before undertaking exercise in pregnancy, to ensure they do not have any problems preventing them from exercising safely.

Only a small number of pregnant women are unable to continue with exercise during pregnancy due to complications or risk factors. However, one study showed fewer than 15% of pregnant women were following recommended exercise guidelines, with many reducing or ceasing exercise during their pregnancy. Exercise during pregnancy has many important health benefits for the mother and baby, so should be encouraged for all uncomplicated pregnancies. Some pregnant women feel uncertain with how to continue exercising during their pregnancy, and would prefer to exercise with suitable guidance and advice.

Our Pre/Postnatal Fitness classes offer women the opportunity to undertake cardiovascular and strength-conditioning exercise specifically tailored for this special population, under the supervision and guidance of a physiotherapist. The main body of the class runs for 45 minutes in a circuit format, with group warm up and cool down time before and after the class. The physiotherapist supervising the class can also give guidance on appropriately monitoring your exercise intensity, and on exercises you could also perform at home.

The classes are open to women who are either pregnant or within 12 months of having their baby, and who have medical clearance to exercise during pregnancy. All women will need to have a 1:1 session with a physiotherapist before starting classes, to ensure they have no other problems, and to run through the basic class format and exercises, to ensure the exercises can be performed safely and are right for them.

How to Book

Before starting classes, you will need to attend a 1:1 Assessment with one of our Physiotherapists so they can speak to you in more detail about your pregnancy, any issues you may be experiencing, your general health, and the basics of Pilates.

If you’re pregnant, we also require a signed Medical Clearance from your GP, Midwife or Obstetrician before you commence classes. We happily provide a simple template for your Doctor to complete on your behalf, and we also accept a signed letter or general Pregnancy Consent Form instead.

To book an assessment, you can:

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